Object: Shipibo Pottery

E_2014_3_7small

Fig 1: Shipibo Pottery Vessel. Image Credit Sam Noble Museum Ethnology Department. E/2014/003/007

E/2014/3/007

Bowl

Shipibo Culture

Peru

Unknown Date, Possibly 1960s-1970s

Clay, Paint Slip

 

This post’s object, a Shipibo ceramic vessel comes to us from the Shipibo people of Peru. The Shipibo people traditionally live near the Ucayali River, a southern tributary of the Upper Amazon in Peru.  The vessel measures 5.875” H x 5.875” W x 5.875” D.  The clay has a natural earthy red tone, which can be seen in the interior and bottom of the vessel. The exterior of the vessel is highly decorated with a cream colored base. On top of the cream base, layers of intricately woven geometric patterns are painted over the surface of the vessel in black and terracotta. There are two faces, one on each side of the vessel. The nose and ears of the face are sculpted and are part of the body of the pot.

The style of Shipibo pottery is easily identified by its geometric line patterns, and while one may believe these patterns are guided by rigid stylistic rules, each Shipibo pottery is unique. Like a fingerprint, no vessel will have the same patterning as another, and the artist is encouraged to tap into their own inspiration as they work across the surface. Another unique aspect of  Shipibo artists is that they are almost exclusively women. This tradition of women as community artists has given women today the opportunity to economically support their families through the selling of wares to tourists and collectors.

36706638286_0c271f7455_k

Fig 2. A Shipibo woman shows of the distinct line patterning on a textile. Photo credit by Photo by Juan Carlos Huayllapuma/CIFOR is licensed under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

Often times, women work together on a single piece. In these instances, the women seem to have an unspoken understanding of their collaborative efforts. Where one woman may finish a layer of line work, the next steps in to add even further intricacies with only their personal interpretations to guide them. In some cases, the artist is inspired by the aid of colorfully veined plant leaves, called iponquënë . Women place these leaves on their closed eyelids in order to trace their complicated vein patterns.

11949826476_3110402a35_k

Fig. 3.  A variation of Ayuahausca brewing on the fire. Traditionally ayuahausca is used in                                 Shipibo shamanic rituals and can create vivid visions in it’s users.                “Preparación de ayahuasca con chacruna”  by Jairo Galvis Henao  Licensed is under, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

The meaning behind these intricate patterns has been a subject of hot interpretation by anthropologists, ethnologists, and other researchers. Some believe the lines represent an early form of language. Others instead insist that the patterning is derived from early attempts to map the Amazon’s winding river systems. However, according to the Shipibo themselves, these patterns are derived from their shamanic practices aided by the use of ayuahausca, and serve as a reminder of the forces that were once visible to humans.

In mythic times, patterns like the ones that decorate Shipibo pottery, textiles and clothing, covered the entire world. These patterns flowed across the sky, trees, huts, people, and animals. All things were interconnected by this system of winding patterns. But due to the misdeeds of early humans, this idyllic union was ruptured and the world was shifted into three planes: Nëtë ŝhama (the sky world), Mai (the earth world), and Jënë ŝhama (the subaquatic underworld). Simultaneously, periodicity (day and night, or time), mortality, and speciation appeared. (1)

 

 

References:

(1) Roe, Peter G.  (1980). “Art and residence among the Shipibo Indians of Peru: A Study in Microacculturation.”American Anthropologist, 82, 42–71.

Pantone, Dan James. (2004).  Shipibo Indians. Retrieved from http://www.amazon-indians.org/shipibo-indians-masters-ayahuasca-01.html

Roe, Peter and Bahuan Mëtsa. Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian. National Museum of the American Indian  Retrieved from http://nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/infinityofnations/amazon/239608.html

0 Responses to “Object: Shipibo Pottery”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




Ethnology @ SNOMNH is an experimental weblog for sharing the collections of the Division of Ethnology at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

Archives

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,695 other followers


%d bloggers like this: